Monday Trivia #135 [Don Zeko wins!]

California, New York, Texas.

Florida, New York.

Alabama, Illinois, Missouri, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia.

Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, DC, Georgia, Hawaii, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Utah, Washington, Wisconsin.

Delaware, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont, West Virginia, Wyoming.

Ed note: Due to a transcription error, New York was erroneously listed as having four when it only has three and Mississippi was left off.

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32 thoughts on “Monday Trivia #135 [Don Zeko wins!]

  1. Aqueduct systems? California has four: the Los Angeles Aqueduct draining the eastern Sierra to water Los Angeles; the California Water Project distributing Delta water throughout the San Joaquin Valley and watering the rest of urban metro LA; the Hetch Hetchy system watering San Francisco and other cities in the Bay Area, and the All-American Aqueduct watering San Diego and its environs.

    I know there are at least two major aqueduct systems watering NYC, maybe three, and maybe the Erie Canal counts as another? It seems inconceivable that the Dallas/Ft. Worth metro area is not watered from elsewhere despite native resources because they’re so big, and river and ground water seem like they wouldn’t be enough for either Houston or San Antonio so…

    Anyway, that’s my guess.

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    • don’t forget the Colorado River Aqueduct, the Central Valley Project, and the Mokelumne Aqueducts. (there are more systems, but these 7 are the most important ones.)

      And the All-American Canal only irrigates Imperial County and the eastern side of the Coachella Valley in Riverside County. San Diego has talked about building a pipeline over the San Jacinto Mountains, but that’s just silliness it puts out every now and again to piss off the Metropolitan Water District.

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  2. Number of public universities and branch schools. This includes 2 year and 4 year systems and separates it. SUNY-Purchase is one school, SUNY-Stony Brook another, etc.

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    • Could be. So how do we figure four for California? University of California system is one, California State University system is another, the junior college network would be a third… what’s the fourth? I think the Maritime Academy is part of CSU and Hastings COL is part of UC.

      I know little about public universities in New York other than that there are a lot of campuses for SUNY and that NYC has either a big ol’ community college or its own four-year university, maybe both. But that gets us only to three systems in NY too… But again, I must admit a degree of ignorance.

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    • Hmm… Colorado has eight public four-year schools when you count independent boards of regents/trustees (why we think we need eight, a couple with multiple campuses, is another question). How about number of universities or university systems (all campuses combined), with enrollments greater than Y for some appropriate value of Y? The University of Puerto Rico has a considerable number of students when all of its campuses are added together.

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  3. Just parsing the list for useful information… 56 of whatever it is when Puerto Rico is added to the original list. That may not be accurate, unless Mississippi is another zero, since that state doesn’t appear on the list (or perhaps Will has demoted them to territorial status?).

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    • I am outraged by this level of inequality. The top 1% have literally infinitely times more wins than the bottom quintile, or even the median participant.

      We need to redistribute these wins, lest Messrs Harris, Thompson, and Schilling find their heads on pikes.

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      • The obvious solution is the Harrison Bergerson one, where people of greater capabilities are given handicaps to bring them down to the norm. Accordingly, those at the top will be given a forced diet of Rand, Nozick, and Rothbard.

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