Ten Second News

Geography, Politics, and Arrogance

Last week, Erik and I had a fun discussion about the role of geography in shaping one’s political opinions, what this means for Erik’s arguments for competitive federalism and localism, and the way in which our national debates largely cast aside the actual problems faced by actual people in favor of scoring broader points, thereby…

Political Trolls: What the GOP Hath Sowed

Scott’s post last week attacking the Republican behavior before, during and after the health care debate generated quite the lively discussion in the comments thread.  Scott and many primarily left-of-center commenters argued that the Republican and conservative leadership need to own up to their responsibility in fomenting death threats because “the very participation of Republican…

In Praise of Jane Hamsher, et al: Redefining the Art of the Possible

Jane Hamsher has been taking a lot of flak in recent days for coming out against the Senate health care reform bill as well as for suggesting that “both the [progressive opponents] and the tea party activists are saying almost the exact same thing about the Senate bill” and that the “painfully obvious left/right transpartisan consensus…

Fragmentation

Esteemed co-blogger Chris Dierkes has a challenging post on the democratic process. Here’s a decent summary: In our late modern (or postmodern if you like) world, with the proliferation of many interests and sub-interests, causing fragmentation across society (”the long tail” phenomenon), aligning interests becomes nearly impossible. There are too many interests, too many too…