Ten Second News

National Review and Prop 19

Here’s an odd statement from Andrew Sullivan: A search for a single mention of Prop 19 in today’s National Review found only this measured piece by Reihan, one of our most illustrious Dish alums. Buckley’s days truly are over at his magazine, aren’t they? I know for a fact that Andrew linked to Kevin Williamson’s…

Actually, I’d like to know how D’Souza thinks

I realize that political publications lob softball questions at ideological fellow-travelers all the time, but National Review’s “interview” with Dinesh D’Souza about his bizarre Forbes cover story is truly embarrassing. First, he gets basic facts wrong: But conventional liberals don’t come out for the release of the Lockerbie bomber. Conventional liberals don’t return the bust…

A farewell to supply-side economics

Writing in National Review, Kevin Williamson lays waste the ‘magical thinking’ of supply-siders and the notion that somehow tax cuts will completely pay for themselves. There’s a great deal of really excellent stuff in the article, but here’s a good bit: When the Reagan tax cuts were being designed, the original supply-side crew thought that…

Too little colonialism?

At the Corner, Mark Krikorian proposes one possible explanation for Haiti’s woes: My guess is that Haiti’s so screwed up because it wasn’t colonized long enough. The ancestors of today’s Haitians, like elsewhere in the Caribbean, experienced the dislocation of de-tribalization, which disrupted the natural ties of family and clan and ethnicity. They also suffered…

Crickets

National Review’s response to former Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge’s allegation that Bush pressured him to raise the terror alert status on the eve of the 2004 election is this stirring post from Kathryn Jean Lopez: But how can someone whose title is director of homeland security not resign if he believes the security of…

The Salad Bowl

Jonah Goldberg makes an odd claim in his latest column: The mainstream perception that conservatives are close-minded and dogmatic while liberals are open-minded and free-thinking has it almost exactly backward. Liberal dogma is settled: The government should do good, where it can, whenever it can. That is President Obama’s idea of pragmatism and bipartisanship: He’s…

A Plea for Engagement

Via the American Conservative, I see that Sean Scallon’s challenging article on Jimmy Carter is getting some well-deserved attention. And for that, I’m glad – it’s an interesting take on a fascinating historical figure.  But you know who I’d really like to see respond to Scallon’s piece? How about a National Review symposium, or perhaps…

Stranger than Nonfiction

Looking for a glimpse into the conservative foreign policy id? Try National Review’s Rich Lowry, whose latest techno-thriller has just been published: After learning that an Iranian scientist is in the process of developing nuclear weapons on Iranian soil, all-but-forgotten Spymaster Stewart Banquo initiates a rogue special operation. With the assistance of his most trusted…