Ten Second News

Why wealth inequality is not unjust, but power inequality is

In a previous post, I explained that one of the underlying sources of disagreement about basic economic policy is that first world economies are both theoretically and practically complex, and thus may be quite difficult to reconcile with one’s particular theory of justice—e.g., a theory that seeks to ensure some baseline fairness in the distribution…

In defense of quality not quantity: the case for better safety nets, not more entitlements

Reading this Will Wilkinson piece (which is a follow-up to pieces by Megan McArdle, Tyler Cowen, and Michael Cannon – all of whom you should also read on this subject) has gotten me thinking once again about health insurance reform, and especially about the way we think about entitlements in this country.  More specifically I’ve…

Community as safety-net

One of the most common arguments against my call for better, more effective state-provided safety nets is that these safety nets somehow replace those provided by families and close-knit communities.  Apparently if people are provided with health insurance by the state they will no longer have any need for families or their neighbors, and their…

misconceptions and deregulation

Just very briefly – “deregulation” does not mean the stripping away of all rules or the desire to enter into a state of anarchy.  So when I speak of “deregulating” the health care industry, I’m mainly talking about removing rules that prevent competition and create monopoly or that are expensive but provide no real benefit. …

On Safety Nets

“By treating any and all social safety nets as irreversible steps on the Road to Serfdom, we allow liberals and progressives to shape those policies in ways that are inefficient, ineffective, and overbroad – even though Adam Smith, Hayek himself, and Friedman each advocated for a form of social safety net, demonstrating that social safety…